The Museum is closed temporarily. Based on public health officials’ guidance, Goulbourn Museum is closed to the public until further notice.

Meet the Artist – Wendy Southin

Events, exhibits, families, programs

The main focus of Wendy Southin’s business Dragonfly Dreamers is jewelry created using a combination of metalsmithing techniques. Anything from sawing, stamping, hammering, to riveting and patinas may be used on a single creation. She also creates altered art pieces on canvas, mirrors or other interesting objects with a vintage, grungy look and feel. Wendy’s finished work appeals to creative souls who are looking for that special something that speaks to them from within and has that one of a kind Artisan quality, look and feel.
See Wendy’s work on her blog, etsy blog or follow her on facebook & twitter.

Wendy will have her one-of-a-kind handmade pieces available for sale at Uniquely Goulbourn Art & Craft Sale being held at the Goulbourn Museum on Dec. 2 from 1-4 pm.

Meet the Artist – Sheila Cain-Sample

contact, Events, families, programs


This Sunday, Dec. 2nd from 1-4 pm the Museum will be abuzz with local artisans at Uniquely Goulbourn Art & Craft Sale. All week we will be introducing you to the Artists and their talents.
 
Sheila Cain-Sample is a Canadian Artist, mother, wife and full time friend to the environment. Sheila works primarily in graphite for the detail and contrast but she also uses coloured pencil occasionally for the depth and richness.  Photo Realism is her passion so photography plays a big part in her creative process as that is where she plans her composition.   
Sheila also sits on the Museum’s Board of Directors and is curating this Sunday’s art show.  See Sheila’s work on her blog, her photography blog, her Etsy site, or follow her on Twitter.

Uniquely Goulbourn Art & Craft Sale

contact, Events, families, programs

On Dec. 2nd from 1-4 pm the Goulbourn Museum will be alive with local artisans, fresh holiday baking and colourful poinsettias. Kids can make a holiday swag out of fresh greenery while you shop for unique Christmas presents made by some of Goulbourn’s finest artists.

Uniquely Goulbourn Art & Craft Show is an opportunity to shop locally for fine handmade gifts of jewelry, art, soap, hand-turned wood, and knitting. The 3rd Stittsville Pathfinders will be selling baked goods and raising money for a trip to Switzerland and there will be two specialty bakers selling gluten-free baking.

Stay tuned to our blog this week for profiles of each of the artists. Hope to see you on Sunday!

Letters from the Front – Part 8

100th Regiment, exhibits, families, programs, research


  In letter number eight, Pte. Sefton Steward of the 77th Battalion has sad news to share with his family at home in Richmond Ontario. The complete letters will be on display until the end of November at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

France – February 5, 1917
Dear Mother,
                Am just out of the trenches and have some very sad news to tell you which I suppose you have already heard about.  Poor Sid was killed on February 4th while being engaged in a raid on Fritz’s trench.  It certainly is hard news to break to you as I know how the people of Richmond and surrounding country will feel over it, especially Miss Dorras who I am going to write to.
                The rest of our lads are safe, but there were quite a few casualties throughout the Ottawa Valley.  Harry Guy from Stittsville was also killed.  There were also two other casualties out of our own battalion.  It is almost impossible to send any of their belongings home.  Of course, they would be of little use at any rate.
                I am sure this will go hard on you people around Richmond.  There is so much going on here and we get so used to such things that we can scarcely realize that he (Sid) is gone.
                I think we are now done on the front and are going out for divisional rest.  It was kind of a dangerous position we held here.  They have been making these raids all along the line as you will see in the papers.  There is great talk of peace at present as I am sure the papers are full of it.  Heard today that the States declared war on Germany, but it is hard to say whether it is certain yet.  If so, I think it will bring the war to a close shortly.
                Well, Mother, you don’t want to get uneasy when hearing any of these reports as you will always get direct word.  Well, poor Sid is out of all troubles now, the only worry will be to his parents and friends.  Ervie has been very lucky, together with myself.
With love to all,
Sefton

Letters from the Front – Part 7

100th Regiment, collections, contact, Events, exhibits, families, programs, research


Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.
This is letter number seven.
The Goulbourn Museum’s wartime display at the Stittsville Library.

Somewhere in France – December 31, 1916
Dear Mother:
                Just came out of the trenches after being in for six days which included Christmas.  It was certainly a new Xmas for us.  It continued raining throughout the day; everything was quite quiet all day until coming on night when they opened up their artillery quite freely, keeping this up longer than usual.  On our side, the bombardment didn’t cause much harm.
                Got two parcels from you sent some time ago.  Had a letter from Earl the other day.  He was getting along splendidly.  He is a lucky lad all right as he will miss all the bad weather and will hardly be back here again.  Sid and Ervie are both fine.  Haven’t seen Arthur but have seen some of his Battalion who told me he was fine.  Did you get any of those Xmas cards I sent?
                I got a letter from you, Jonathan Craig and a Xmas card from Irene Neelin.  We haven’t yet seen the plum pudding they spoke of in the papers but we may get something extra tomorrow.
                I suppose you have nice cold weather in Canada.  How are they getting along their rink which I heard was to be started some time ago?
                The trenches are very muddy this time of the year, being half full of water in some places.  Have been using long, hip rubber boots when in the worst parts of the line.  On Xmas day we nearly had a few Fritzies coming over.  We were out in a saf, which is a trench running out in front of the main line, which is really a strong point.  We didn’t do any sniping Xmas day, but put on a hot celebration that night.  You speak of us getting our furloughs. They are yet to come.
With love to all,
Sefton

Letters from the Front – Part 6

100th Regiment, collections, Events, exhibits, families, programs, research

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number six:

















Somewhere in France – September 22, 1916

Dear Mother:

                Received your letter written Sept. 5th the other day, being very glad to hear from you all.  Today I got letters from Clystal, Jonathan and Austin Dilworth.

                I suppose George is back from the Fair.  If he went, I hope he made out good; anyway it would be a good time for him.  I am writing this in a dugout on my knees.  By the time you receive this, the Richmond fair will be over.  Hope there is fine weather for it.  It has been very wet here lately, making the trenches very muddy and miserable.

                We are now unable to send mail regularly as we were before.  As you know, it has to be censored by our own officers.  How did Pa and George get along with the grain?  There must have been a splendid crop on the six acres.

                They are now holding the Germans down very good but they are sure hardy guys.  There is great talk of the war being over by Xmas, so they are rushing things at all points.

                I am sure that Eric would have a splendid trip west, together with the other Richmond lads.  How are Channon and Willie getting along?

                You mentioned in your last letter about Sam McFee’s brother getting shot in the leg being an accident, but it wasn’t.  It was a bullet from a machine gun that hit him while out working.

                I hear Miss Cowell is Evyleen’s teacher, also George’s.  Did you ever get my old 77thbadges which I sent just before leaving Bramshott?  If sending any underwear, send full length.  You were talking of sending money.  Well, we can get Canadian money exchanged here.

                Must close for now.

Best love to all,
Sefton

Letters from the Front – Part 5

100th Regiment, collections, exhibits, families, research

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number five:

The complete letters from Pte. Sefton Stewart are on display at the Stittsville Library.











August 25, 1916
Dear Grandfather,

Received your letter August 23rd, being very much pleased to hear from you.  I suppose on hearing of us in Belgium will be a surprise to you.  Our visit in England was much shorter than I expected.  We are now over in France and Belgium about two weeks.
On this front they seem to be holding the Germans very well, but things have been quite quiet lately.  The other day, they put over a number of large shells around our quarters, not doing much harm.  The report of these large guns was hard on the nerves at first but we are getting used to it.  Already there have been five killed and several wounded out of our Battalion.  I suppose you think well of the Scottish Battalion.
Have you been down home lately? I think you should go down and keep mother company.  You are already aware that we can’t give any information that would put anybody wise to our situation…
Best love,
Sefton

Letters from the Front – Part 4

100th Regiment, collections, Events, exhibits, families, programs


Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number four:
August 24, 1916 – Somewhere
Dear Mother,
                Received two of your letters today, one from George, and one from Clystal.  The mail is delayed some on account of our Battalion being divided.  It is certainly interesting to travel over this country, seeing the fine property all in destruction.  The Belgians seem a very quiet, friendly race of people.

                I suppose you have already heard of the casualties out of the 73rd.  These were out of the other company who are separated from us.  They were coming out of the trenches, being green on the job, and got shelled.  A company is now out with a working party taking supplies up to the trenches and repairing.  Of course, all this is done during the night.  When you get into the dugout, it is something like an underground world, everything being up to date.

                How are they getting along with the harvest?  You had a very good hay crop.  That is a good idea working together with the Neelins.

                Tonight I am not out, so am taking the opportunity of writing under the light of a candle.

With best love to all,
Sefton

PS.  The Allies seem to have the best of the Germans, but today they put quite a few shells over, not doing much harm.  It is thought the war will be over about Xmas.

Letters from the Front – Part 3

100th Regiment, Events, exhibits, research

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.
This is letter number three:

Somewhere, August 20, 1916


Dear Mother:

                Just a few lines to let you know we are all well, hoping you are all the same.  Did you receive my letter written shortly after we arrived in France?  Stopped in France a few days and then came right through to Belgium.  France and Belgium are more like Canada than England; the crops being splendid.

                You already know that they are very particular about any information given, making it hard what to say.  The airships are continually flying over our heads.  It is certainly great to see how they can handle them.  Quite often, shells are to be seen bursting all around one, from a distance they seem close.  It is said the Germans are very done out on the front, but are causing quite an excitement yet.  Our camp is surrounded by Belgian crops and houses.

                I forgot to tell in my other letter of receiving a cake when in Bramshott, but didn’t know whether it was from you or Clystal.  Anyway, the box was all broken up, together with the cake, but we certainly enjoyed it.  One thing missing most now is money, not being paid for about a month and only getting one franc or 20 cents per day.  Some of the other fellows have got word or different parcels which were sent but haven’t received them yet.  A parcel mostly takes about a week longer than a letter.

                The other evening we were very much surprised in seeing Roy Tubman and Tom Touchette, a son of Mrs. Rob Hills.  Roy looks fine.  He has been over here ten months and says he has certainly been very lucky, having some close escapes.  Touchette knew quite a few of the boys on account of coming over in the 77th draft.

                I haven’t yet got an envelope for this letter, which is a very scarce article here.

                The Germans seem to know every move, having up on a sign board “Welcome 73rd”.  The British Artillery seems to be landing over the shells much thicker than the Germans.  We were told Alvin Danby was quite close to our camp but just moved away a day before we came in.  How are Pa and George getting along at the harvest?  I suppose they have it almost finished by this time.  I guess George and Irene throw on while Eva mows back.  You will want to get Clystal up for the potato season.

                I don’t think Channon Hall would be able to stand it over here.  We feel very bad for poor Arthur being separated from us, but the last time I saw him was in Bramshott.  He was then looking fine.  It is said their quarters are about a mile over from us.  One companion we always have is our gas helmet.  In fact, we carry two all the time.  School will soon be starting again.  George will want to start as soon as possible.

 
Best love to all,

Sefton

Letters from the Front – Part 2

100th Regiment, exhibits, research

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number two:


Bramshott Camp, England
July 3rd

Dear Mother:

                Mailed you a letter July 2nd but didn’t know our present condition.  We are now transferred into the 73 Battalion.  These are Highlanders, so we will have to put on the kilts.  This is looked upon as the best Battalion that ever left Canada.  All the 77th is being broken up too.  Some fine big men out of the 77th have been turned down for the slightest drawback, such as weak heart or eyes.

                We are now in one of a string of buildings similar to those of the Ottawa Exhibition, which is much better than tents.  Tomorrow we expect to go to the range to shoot for about a week. Sunday evening we went over to Hazlemere, a nice little town, in a motor.  The roads seem very strange.  They are good but very narrow and both sides are lined with hedge or bushes….

Best love to all,
Sefton





Goulbourn Museum

Goulbourn Museum