The Museum is closed temporarily. Based on public health officials’ guidance, Goulbourn Museum is closed to the public until further notice.

Exceptional Women and the War of 1812 Exhibit on at the Stittsville Library

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The Goulbourn Museum’s “Exceptional Women and the War of 1812″ exhibit is currently on display at the Stittsville Public Library. Read about the bravery of Laura Secord and Maria Hill and see some artefacts belonging to women of that era.  
One featured artefact is an old-fashioned curling iron.  This item would have been a necessity for upper class women for the purpose of finding a suitable husband and maintaining the appearance of an upper class lifestyle.
Free copies of the Museum’s new booklet “Goulbourn’s Top 12 of 1812″ are also available at our display.  The booklet tells the story of 12 exceptional individuals from Goulbourn’s past and details their achievements. Characters such as Andrew Spearman, Maria Hill and John Crozier are profiled. 
The Exceptional Women and the War of 1812 exhibit will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library until August 31st.

Child’s Christmas present from 1925 safely stored in Goulbourn Museum’s collection

collections, Events, exhibits, families, programs, research

By Jennifer Adams

This doll was given to a little girl as a Christmas present in 1925. Just over six decades later, in 1991, it was donated to the Goulbourn Museum and has resided in our collection ever since.

Many of you may recognize this doll from our Museum banner at City Hall. It was chosen, along with two other artefacts, to represent our family-friendly site. Even though her paint is peeling and her face is cracked and chipped, this doll’s ability to represent a much loved pastime of many little girls cannot be overlooked.

The mid-1920s in Canada was a time of great prosperity for some, but for others it was a time of poverty. Many families did not have the money to buy their children toys and some children worked so hard in the home and fields that there was not much time for playing. More often than not, if a girl did receive a doll it was on a special occasion like Christmas.  Because a child would usually only receive one doll during her childhood, (if they received one at all), she would take extra special care of it. It not only had to last the rest of her childhood but there was also the hope of passing it down to her future daughter too.

This toy, known as a composition doll, reached the height of its popularity in the 1920s -1940s. The heads, and sometimes the limbs, of composition dolls were molded out of sawdust mixed with glue. Their heads were easier to manufacture and less likely to break when played with compared to porcelain dolls. Naturally, these American-made dolls gained popularity and German porcelain doll making companies lost favour.
The decades have taken their toll on this doll but like many women who can recall having a favourite doll, this one would have been loved and cherished by a little girl beginning on Christmas morning, 1925.

Question: At the height of the composition doll’s popularity, what famous person’s look-a-like doll was the most sought after? 

Answer:  Shirley Temple.

Early to mid-19th century style cloth dolls on display until the end of August

100th Regiment, collections, Events, exhibits, families, programs, research

Two of the cloth dolls on display at the Goulbourn Museum.
By Jennifer Adams

Now on display at Goulbourn Museum until the end of August is a wonderful collection of modern made early to mid-19th century style cloth dolls. These dolls were all handmade by members of the Ottawa-based cloth doll club All Dolled Up.

Each doll takes a lot of work to make, as well as time and patience to get it just right. The fine detailing on the faces requires trial and error until the final product matches the doll maker’s vision for the doll. 

This style of cloth doll is reminiscent of the toys that girls would have had in the early days of Goulbourn Township when the War of 1812 was still fresh in everyone’s mind.

Among the 12 dolls on display at the Museum there is also a horse, two dogs and a duck.  Sitting atop the horse is General Brock wearing his uniform and looking very dignified. Near him are a boy and young man, wearing pioneer clothing accompanied by their dogs and the firewood they have been collecting.  The display case would not be complete without the women that also played a valuable role in our nation’s history. They range from a young girl to older women, some wearing pioneer clothing, others wearing gentry clothing. These dolls are shown knitting, collecting food from the fields and doing laundry.

In addition to the Goulbourn Museum, All Dolled Up has also had their dolls on display at art galleries and local functions.  

Meet Stephanie Miles – Collections Assistant

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Stephanie Miles
Goulbourn Museum has been like a second home to me over the past four years.  My initial involvement began as a co-op student during high school and this led to three years of volunteer service.  During those three years I completed the Applied Museum Studies Program at Algonquin College and recently graduated with Honours after completing a four-month internship as Educational Programming Assistant at Goulbourn.

I was extremely pleased to be the successful candidate for the seven-week Collections Assistant position at the Museum which is being offered through the Province of Ontario’s Summer Experience Program.  This position will allow me to put various elements from my last three years of learning into practice while at the same time gaining further experience in the area of Collections Management.

My main objective this summer is to assist with the organization of the Museum’s large collection of artefacts.  There are a number of tasks that must be completed in order to meet this objective. These tasks include: recording artefact accession numbers and comparing these to the Museum’s collections database, photo documentation of artefacts and recording each artefact’s dimensions and location.

I am excited to be involved with this project and look forward to the upcoming weeks.

Meet Jennifer Adams – Curatorial Assistant

collections, Events, exhibits, families, programs, research

Jennifer Adams

I am very pleased to be working at the Goulbourn Museum for the summer as a Curatorial Assistant.  As a student in the Applied Museums Studies program at Algonquin College, having an opportunity to combine what I am learning in the classroom with hands on working experience before I graduate is very beneficial.

I previously obtained a Bachelor of Arts with Honours in Anthropology from Laurentian University and this has proven to compliment my museum interests well.  During my time at university I was able to take part in a six week archaeological field course put on by one of my professors in collaboration with the anthropology department.  I, along with 11 other students, our professor and two graduates of the program excavated a 15th century Huron-Wendat site in Southern Ontario. We set up our tents in the field next to the dig site and spent long hours excavating, sifting dirt through mesh screens, cleaning and cataloguing artefacts and writing detailed accounts of our day.  We found broken pieces of pottery, animal bones and beads and, of course many rocks.  These findings all came from an area in old settlements called “middens” – 15th century garbage dumps.  Archaeologists like to dig in middens because of the large number of artefacts they can find there.

After less than a month I am already feeling at home at the Goulbourn Museum.  I am eager to see what this summer has to offer and look forward to working with the museum’s staff and volunteers these next few months.

Meet Sarah Norton – Community Programmer & Marketing Assistant

collections, Events, exhibits, families, programs, research

Sarah Norton
This is my first summer working at Goulbourn Museum as a summer student. My job includes a wide variety of tasks and each day I get to challenge myself and learn new skills. 
I am entering my fourth year at Trent University in the Anthropology and Cultural Studies programs; I also play volleyball for the Varsity Women’s Volleyball team. After graduating this year I plan to attend Algonquin College and enter the Applied Museum Studies Program. 
Goulbourn Museum has been an amazing opportunity and has allowed me to explore the many facets of the operation and maintenance of a museum. Some similar experiences I have had in the past include Boyd Archaeology Field School and acting as a summer student at the Arnprior Museum.

War of 1812 Historical Walking Tour at Beechwood Cemetery Sunday, June 9

100th Regiment, Events, families, programs, research

Costumed actors will bring historical figures from the War of 1812 to life at the 2013 Annual Historical Walking Tour at Beechwood Cemetery this Sunday, June 9 at 2 p.m. 
The tour includes five stops at the gravesites of men and women of note from the war including Sgt. Andrew Hill and his wife Maria Hill who were part of the 100th Regiment of Foot. Following the war, Sgt. Hill received 200 acres of land in Goulbourn Township.  He and Maria opened a tavern named Duke of Richmond Arms and he also worked as a clerk in the commissary offices that supervised the military depot until 1822. 
Don’t miss this stroll through beautiful and historic Beechwood, the National Cemetery of Canada.  Refreshments will be served after the tour. Enter by Beechwood Avenue entrance. Tour and parking are free. Wear good walking shoes.
For more information call 613-741-9530 or visit Beechwood’s website for more information.

War of 1812 on Stage at Arts Court

100th Regiment, Events, families, programs

The Magnetic North Theatre Festival is offering the Goulbourn Museum a 50% discount on the price of tickets to The History of the Village of the Small Huts 1812-15.  (Tickets must be ordered by May 31st to get the discount.)

Written and Directed by Michael Hollingsworth this VideoCabaret Production is on stage at Arts Court Theatre from June 7-15, 2013.

The War of 1812 not only set fire to sold-out houses and slayed critics in Stratford last summer, but has just had its run at Toronto’s Young Centre for the Performing Arts extended by two weeks.  The VideoCabaret Ensemble heads directly from Toronto to Ottawa for the Magnetic North Theatre Festival.

You’ll be awed by the agility of the VideoCabaret Ensemble as they expertly switch into countless different roles and costumes.  One of these amazing actors is Ottawa raised Linda Prystawska, daughter of retired National Arts Centre Concert Master Walter Prystawski.

Click here for more information and to buy tickets.  Use the code VIDCAB to get 50% off the regular ticket price for this show.  Offer is good until May 31st!

We’re Hiring! Summer Student Position Available at Museum

contact, programs, research

The Goulbourn Museum is looking for a post-secondary student to work 37.5 hours per week for 14 weeks at $11.00 per hour. Job duties include: developing and assisting with public programs, registering artefacts, and providing Museum tours.

All candidates must be registered on the Young Canada Works (YCW) database. This position is subject to availability of funding through the YCW program.

Candidates require excellent English language skills and computer competency. French language skills and knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite are assets. Job shifts include weekends and statutory holidays. There is no public transportation to the Museum site.

Applications will be accepted by email or in-person until 4:00 p.m. on Sunday, May 12, 2013. Goulbourn Museum, 2064 Huntley Road, Stittsville, ON, K2S 1B8 goulbmus@rogers.com

From the Collection – Artefact from WWI

collections, exhibits, research

This military headdress and cap badge belonged to a member of the 38th Battalion during the First World War. Popularly known as the 38th “Ottawa” or the “Royal Ottawas” this Battalion was organized in 1914 as an infantry battalion of the Canadian Expeditionary Force.

The 38th saw action in numerous battles including the Somme, Vimy, Ypres, and Passchendaele and was awarded an amazing 299 individual decorations for bravery during the war. The 38th returned home to Ottawa in June of 1919 and the unit was demobilized, having nearly 4,000 officers and non-commissioned members passing through its ranks between its arrival in France, August 1916, and the armistice in November 1918.

Following the war the history and honours of the 38th Battalion would be perpetuated by the 43rd Regiment, keeping their heritage alive as they continue on to this day as The Cameron Highlanders of Ottawa.





Goulbourn Museum

Goulbourn Museum