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Archive for the ‘100th Regiment’ Category

Majic 100: Museum of the Week, part 2

June 16th, 2012

Here is the ad you will hear on Majic 100 (today only!) for our Bicentennial Celebration event tomorrow. We have a lot of fun activities planned, including a craft called Mako a Shako, a game called Find the Shilling, and a photo booth where you can dress in period costume and pose for pictures. We also have two new exhibits about the War of 1812 launching, a presentation planned, a silent auction with tons of local goodies, a book sale and even a BBQ.

The Ottawa Museum Network has set up a contest with the station so listeners have a chance to win the new Connexion Card, an annual family pass to nine local museums in Ottawa, with tons of great benefits!

Enter the Museum of the Week contest here.
Check out the Ottawa Museum Network here.

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LAURA SECORD: A heroine forgotten in her lifetime

June 15th, 2012

War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration

Laura Secord was taken by native scouts to tell her news to British soldiers on June 22, 1813. Image from Canadian Military Heritage Gateway website.


Laura Secord is our most celebrated heroine. But after the war, people of Upper Canada paid little attention to the heroic act of this Loyalist woman who lived in virtual obscurity, struggling to make financial ends meet. In 1860, the Prince of Wales learned of Laura’s wartime heroism and gave a gift of 100 pounds. It was her first public recognition. But it would be nearly a century until a monument was raised to pay tribute to this brave woman. 

Discover more about Laura Secord at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo booth.

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We’re Majic 100’s Museum of the Week

June 13th, 2012


We’re proud to say that Goulbourn Museum is the Museum of the Week on the radio station Majic 100. The Ottawa Museum Network has set up a contest with the station so listeners have a chance to win the new Connexion Card, an annual family pass to nine local museums in Ottawa, with tons of great benefits!

Enter the Museum of the Week contest here.
Check out the Ottawa Museum Network here.

And most importantly, visit the Museum this Sunday, June 17 for our big War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration! We have a lot of fun activities planned, including a craft called Mako a Shako, a game called Find the Shilling, and a photo booth where you can dress in period costume and pose for pictures. We also have two new exhibits about the War of 1812 launching, a presentation planned, a silent auction with tons of local goodies, a book sale and even a BBQ.

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LYDIA BURKE: A strong woman beside the successful man

June 12th, 2012

War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration

 
Copy of the couple’s 1817 marriage licence obtained from St-Gabriel Presbyterian Church in Montreal
by descendant Barbara McCourt.  

She was Lydia Grant, an Irish woman who married a career officer, George Thew Burke, a captain in the 100th Regiment of Foot, who fought with Sir Isaac Brock at Queenston Heights and with Wellington at Waterloo. This devoted couple raised their nine children in Richmond where he was superintendent of the military settlement, a colonel in the militia and a MP in the Parliament of Upper Canada. She died at 37 years of age.

Discover more about Lydia Burke at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo booth.

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AGATHE NOWLAN: Love letters from the war front

June 8th, 2012

War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration
 


Credit Maurice Nowlan’s letters from the war front were cherished by Agathe, “my Dearest jewel.” Letters from Bibliotheque et Archives Nationales du Quebec.

Montreal’s high society was the setting for romance as the dashing Irish officer from the 100th Regiment of Foot wooed the wealthy French-Canadian woman. Lieut. Maurice Nowlan went off to guard the Canadian borders so the young couple wrote copious letters — he in various forts, and she at her parents’ home. Prior to a night attack, Lieut. Nowlan’s final letter is a poignant tribute to their love.

Discover more about Agathe Nowlan at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo booth.

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JANE VAUGHAN: A lady in love with an Irish soldier

June 4th, 2012

War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration


Her family was fleeing the troubles in Ireland when a shipboard romance changed a young girl’s life. The image is the front cover of Jane Barrett’s 1976 novel, Woman of Ireland.

Lady Jane Copeland fell madly in love with the handsome passenger on the tall ship heading for the Canadian colonies. But her Irish mother was not happy at the intention of her teenaged daughter to marry this red-coated soldier from the 100th Regiment of Foot, especially during a war with the United States. But the headstrong girl married William Vaughan without her mother’s blessing.


Discover more about Jane Vaughan at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo-booth.

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CATHERINE LYON: Living dangerously in a war zone

May 29th, 2012

War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration

Credit: A letter by Cathe Lyon on Oct. 16, 1814, from the Archives of Ontario

Catherine Lyon coped with danger every day as the young bride stayed with her husband, Lieut. George Lyon, in British forts under attack on the Niagara frontier. At the Battle of Chippawa, Lieut. Lyon was seriously injured in cannon fire from an American invading army. Catherine later wrote her aunt fearing that if another “dreadful battle” would break out, the British troops would suffer defeat. Luckily, the Americans returned to the United States. 

Discover more about Catherine Lyon at the new exhibit, launching at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo booth.

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MARIA HILL: Disguised as a man, she went off to war

May 22nd, 2012

War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration

An elderly Maria Hill rides in a float for the 1867 confederation parade in Richmond. The image is from a mural painted by Becky Marr-Johnson.

Maria Hill was no stranger to the blood and gore of battlefields as a nurse tending wounded soldiers. She even disguised herself as a man so she could follow her husband to the front lines. The 21-year-old English girl was truly “a daughter of the regiment” as she marched off to war. 

Discover more about Maria Hill at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts,
new exhibitions and even and old-fashioned photo-booth.

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The mural mystery

November 30th, 2011

Where is this mural actually located?
I first saw the historical painting by C.W. Jefferys in the Carleton Saga, by Harry and Olive Walker (p.53) with the caption that it is the soldier-settlers of 100th Regiment of Foot building a rough road to their new settlement of Richmond in 1818. The image shows, on the right side, Capt. George Burke and Sgt. Andrew Hill, and other soldiers from the 100th Regiment which served during the War of 1812. Yet the Walkers never give a photo credit to tell us where this mural can be seen.
I have tried researching many sources such as the National Gallery of Canada or Library and Archives Canada but to no avail. Any ideas??
Kurt Johnson, Munster

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Honouring the valour

November 16th, 2011

Photo by Kurt Johnson
I hope others will come to see Maria Hill as a symbol of the pioneer spirit in the face of adversity. She is certainly a Canadian worthy of greater recognition.
Her husband, Sgt. Andrew Hill, whom she accompanied as a nurse, belonged to the 100th Prince Regent’s Regiment of Foot which fought for king and for Canada during the War of 1812. Sgt. Hill led troops into battle on the Niagara frontier where the 100th Regiment was awarded battle honours for bravery. Maria Hill (1791-1881) tended the wounded and dying soldiers on many battlefields such as the carnage at the battle of Chippawa where the 100th suffered terrible casualties.
After the war, the Hills opened a tavern in the new town on the Jock River, hosting the Duke of Richmond on his 1819 tour. When the duke died, she was called upon to use her nursing skills to dress the duke’s body for his funeral.
With next year’s bicentennial commemorations, we will hear a lot about the many regiments of British soldiers who defended the colonies against the American invaders along with the militia from Upper and Lower Canada and First Nations warriors. And we should remember their valour particularly on Remembrance Day for, as historian Donald E. Graves wrote in the Ottawa Citizen http://www.ottawacitizen.com/life/other+11th+November/5684769/story.html: “Without their courage and sacrifice, there would be no modern Canada because it would be part of the United States.”
Someday, we should erect a plaque to honour Maria and Andrew Hill who are buried at Beechwood Cemetery in a family plot (above) with many descendants. Her name appears on the grave marker as Maria Taylor for her second husband, Andrew Taylor of Richmond.
Kurt Johnson, Munster
Mail to: Kurt@goulbournmuseum.ca

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