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Archive for the ‘100th Regiment’ Category

Letters from the Front – Part 7

November 19th, 2012


Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.
This is letter number seven.
The Goulbourn Museum’s wartime display at the Stittsville Library.

Somewhere in France – December 31, 1916
Dear Mother:
                Just came out of the trenches after being in for six days which included Christmas.  It was certainly a new Xmas for us.  It continued raining throughout the day; everything was quite quiet all day until coming on night when they opened up their artillery quite freely, keeping this up longer than usual.  On our side, the bombardment didn’t cause much harm.
                Got two parcels from you sent some time ago.  Had a letter from Earl the other day.  He was getting along splendidly.  He is a lucky lad all right as he will miss all the bad weather and will hardly be back here again.  Sid and Ervie are both fine.  Haven’t seen Arthur but have seen some of his Battalion who told me he was fine.  Did you get any of those Xmas cards I sent?
                I got a letter from you, Jonathan Craig and a Xmas card from Irene Neelin.  We haven’t yet seen the plum pudding they spoke of in the papers but we may get something extra tomorrow.
                I suppose you have nice cold weather in Canada.  How are they getting along their rink which I heard was to be started some time ago?
                The trenches are very muddy this time of the year, being half full of water in some places.  Have been using long, hip rubber boots when in the worst parts of the line.  On Xmas day we nearly had a few Fritzies coming over.  We were out in a saf, which is a trench running out in front of the main line, which is really a strong point.  We didn’t do any sniping Xmas day, but put on a hot celebration that night.  You speak of us getting our furloughs. They are yet to come.
With love to all,
Sefton

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Letters from the Front – Part 6

November 15th, 2012

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number six:

















Somewhere in France – September 22, 1916

Dear Mother:

                Received your letter written Sept. 5th the other day, being very glad to hear from you all.  Today I got letters from Clystal, Jonathan and Austin Dilworth.

                I suppose George is back from the Fair.  If he went, I hope he made out good; anyway it would be a good time for him.  I am writing this in a dugout on my knees.  By the time you receive this, the Richmond fair will be over.  Hope there is fine weather for it.  It has been very wet here lately, making the trenches very muddy and miserable.

                We are now unable to send mail regularly as we were before.  As you know, it has to be censored by our own officers.  How did Pa and George get along with the grain?  There must have been a splendid crop on the six acres.

                They are now holding the Germans down very good but they are sure hardy guys.  There is great talk of the war being over by Xmas, so they are rushing things at all points.

                I am sure that Eric would have a splendid trip west, together with the other Richmond lads.  How are Channon and Willie getting along?

                You mentioned in your last letter about Sam McFee’s brother getting shot in the leg being an accident, but it wasn’t.  It was a bullet from a machine gun that hit him while out working.

                I hear Miss Cowell is Evyleen’s teacher, also George’s.  Did you ever get my old 77thbadges which I sent just before leaving Bramshott?  If sending any underwear, send full length.  You were talking of sending money.  Well, we can get Canadian money exchanged here.

                Must close for now.

Best love to all,
Sefton

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Letters from the Front – Part 5

November 12th, 2012

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number five:

The complete letters from Pte. Sefton Stewart are on display at the Stittsville Library.











August 25, 1916
Dear Grandfather,

Received your letter August 23rd, being very much pleased to hear from you.  I suppose on hearing of us in Belgium will be a surprise to you.  Our visit in England was much shorter than I expected.  We are now over in France and Belgium about two weeks.
On this front they seem to be holding the Germans very well, but things have been quite quiet lately.  The other day, they put over a number of large shells around our quarters, not doing much harm.  The report of these large guns was hard on the nerves at first but we are getting used to it.  Already there have been five killed and several wounded out of our Battalion.  I suppose you think well of the Scottish Battalion.
Have you been down home lately? I think you should go down and keep mother company.  You are already aware that we can’t give any information that would put anybody wise to our situation…
Best love,
Sefton

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Letters from the Front – Part 4

November 10th, 2012


Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number four:
August 24, 1916 – Somewhere
Dear Mother,
                Received two of your letters today, one from George, and one from Clystal.  The mail is delayed some on account of our Battalion being divided.  It is certainly interesting to travel over this country, seeing the fine property all in destruction.  The Belgians seem a very quiet, friendly race of people.

                I suppose you have already heard of the casualties out of the 73rd.  These were out of the other company who are separated from us.  They were coming out of the trenches, being green on the job, and got shelled.  A company is now out with a working party taking supplies up to the trenches and repairing.  Of course, all this is done during the night.  When you get into the dugout, it is something like an underground world, everything being up to date.

                How are they getting along with the harvest?  You had a very good hay crop.  That is a good idea working together with the Neelins.

                Tonight I am not out, so am taking the opportunity of writing under the light of a candle.

With best love to all,
Sefton

PS.  The Allies seem to have the best of the Germans, but today they put quite a few shells over, not doing much harm.  It is thought the war will be over about Xmas.

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Letters from the Front – Part 3

November 8th, 2012

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.
This is letter number three:

Somewhere, August 20, 1916


Dear Mother:

                Just a few lines to let you know we are all well, hoping you are all the same.  Did you receive my letter written shortly after we arrived in France?  Stopped in France a few days and then came right through to Belgium.  France and Belgium are more like Canada than England; the crops being splendid.

                You already know that they are very particular about any information given, making it hard what to say.  The airships are continually flying over our heads.  It is certainly great to see how they can handle them.  Quite often, shells are to be seen bursting all around one, from a distance they seem close.  It is said the Germans are very done out on the front, but are causing quite an excitement yet.  Our camp is surrounded by Belgian crops and houses.

                I forgot to tell in my other letter of receiving a cake when in Bramshott, but didn’t know whether it was from you or Clystal.  Anyway, the box was all broken up, together with the cake, but we certainly enjoyed it.  One thing missing most now is money, not being paid for about a month and only getting one franc or 20 cents per day.  Some of the other fellows have got word or different parcels which were sent but haven’t received them yet.  A parcel mostly takes about a week longer than a letter.

                The other evening we were very much surprised in seeing Roy Tubman and Tom Touchette, a son of Mrs. Rob Hills.  Roy looks fine.  He has been over here ten months and says he has certainly been very lucky, having some close escapes.  Touchette knew quite a few of the boys on account of coming over in the 77th draft.

                I haven’t yet got an envelope for this letter, which is a very scarce article here.

                The Germans seem to know every move, having up on a sign board “Welcome 73rd”.  The British Artillery seems to be landing over the shells much thicker than the Germans.  We were told Alvin Danby was quite close to our camp but just moved away a day before we came in.  How are Pa and George getting along at the harvest?  I suppose they have it almost finished by this time.  I guess George and Irene throw on while Eva mows back.  You will want to get Clystal up for the potato season.

                I don’t think Channon Hall would be able to stand it over here.  We feel very bad for poor Arthur being separated from us, but the last time I saw him was in Bramshott.  He was then looking fine.  It is said their quarters are about a mile over from us.  One companion we always have is our gas helmet.  In fact, we carry two all the time.  School will soon be starting again.  George will want to start as soon as possible.

 
Best love to all,

Sefton

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Letters from the Front – Part 2

November 6th, 2012

Throughout the month of November we will be posting excerpts from a selection of wartime correspondence between Pte. Sefton Stewart of the 77th Battalion, Canadian Expeditionary Force, and his family in Richmond, Ontario.  The complete letters will be on display at the Stittsville Public Library in the Museum’s exhibit honouring Goulbourn in wartime.

This is letter number two:


Bramshott Camp, England
July 3rd

Dear Mother:

                Mailed you a letter July 2nd but didn’t know our present condition.  We are now transferred into the 73 Battalion.  These are Highlanders, so we will have to put on the kilts.  This is looked upon as the best Battalion that ever left Canada.  All the 77th is being broken up too.  Some fine big men out of the 77th have been turned down for the slightest drawback, such as weak heart or eyes.

                We are now in one of a string of buildings similar to those of the Ottawa Exhibition, which is much better than tents.  Tomorrow we expect to go to the range to shoot for about a week. Sunday evening we went over to Hazlemere, a nice little town, in a motor.  The roads seem very strange.  They are good but very narrow and both sides are lined with hedge or bushes….

Best love to all,
Sefton

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Shipwrecks and Sorrows Lecture Oct. 23

October 19th, 2012

The Ottawa Public Library presents Shipwrecks and Sorrows: Maiden Voyage of the 100th Regiment as part of the History Series for Adults Tuesday, Oct. 23, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. at the Carlingwood branch at 281 Woodroffe Avenue. 
Shipping out to Canada in 1805, the new 100th Regiment of 900 Irish soldiers aboard five troopships met with maritime disasters in the Gulf of St. Lawrence. Only seven survived one shipwreck off Newfoundland while 340 men, women and children died. Two other troopships were wrecked off Nova Scotia. 
This program is presented by historical researcher, Kurt Johnson, a board member of the Goulbourn Museum, in commemoration of the War of 1812.

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Perils and Petticoats

September 18th, 2012

Kurt Johnson will present Perils and Petticoats: Exceptional Women of the War of 1812 at the Stittsville Branch of the Ottawa Public Library on Sept. 25 from 6:30 to 8:00 pm. Click here for more information or to register for the event.

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Goulbourn’s 100th war dead honoured at memorial service

August 8th, 2012

Photo by Kurt Johnson
Military and civilian representatives break ground Saturday for a War of 1812 memorial monument to honour the war dead from the 1813 Battle of Sackets Harbor.

We could feel the emotion of the moment all the more strongly as a Canadian piper played a lament Saturday for the war dead from the Battle of Sackets Harbor. The names of those 49 Canadian and British soldiers who were killed in the War of 1812 raid and buried on the battlefield were read aloud during the special memorial service attended by military re-enactors, regular armed forces and civilian representatives.

Grenadiers of Goulbourn’s 100th Prince Regent’s Regiment of Foot had participated in the May 29, 1813 raid on the strategic military target. The 100th soldiers killed in action included Sgt. William McGarry, Pte. John Carvin, Pte. James Murphy, Michael O’Brian, Pte. Michael Quinn and Pte. John Short. Goulbourn Museum sent me as our representative while William Sinka represented the Friends of the 100th, a proposed living history re-enactors group.

Other regiments include 1st Regiment (Royal Scots), 8th Regiment, 104th (New Brunswick) Regiment, Glengarry Light Infantry, Royal Newfoundland Fencibles, Voltigeurs Canadiens, Nova Scotia Fencibles and Royal Navy.

Saturday’s memorial service was very much an international affair, between friends across the border, as officials from Canada and United States attended the event organized by the Sackets Harbor Battlefield State Historic Site; the Sackets Harbor Battlefield Alliance Inc. and the community of Sackets Harbor. A ground-breaking ceremony was also held to mark commencement of the construction of a granite monument and individual soldier’s stones to honour the sacrifices of the Crown Forces in the battle.

Standing at the site in a farmer’s clover field, I was struck by the solemn nature of the service that paid tribute to the sacrifice of these soldiers for king and country. I was also touched by the congeniality of the Americans and Canadians who have shared 200 years of peace.

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New travelling exhibit: the 100th Regiment of Foot

August 1st, 2012

Today we installed a new bilingual and portable version of our exhibit all about the 100th Regiment at the Stittsville Library. This exhibit features a life-size silhouette of a soldier so you can see if you “measure-up” and meet one of the enlistment requirements, as well as information about the War of 1812 and the soldier’s transition from Northern Ireland to Canada. And just to make sure the panel was working, we asked a few children (and staff) to pose with the silhouette :) On display at the Library from August 1-31.

After checking this exhibit, why not stop by the Museum and learn the rest of the story – we have a new exhibit about the Exceptional Women in the War of 1812 on now, as well as an exhibit called Voyage of Goulbourn’s 100th Regiment :)

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