Archive for the ‘exhibits’ Category

LYDIA BURKE: A strong woman beside the successful man

June 12th, 2012

War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration

 
Copy of the couple’s 1817 marriage licence obtained from St-Gabriel Presbyterian Church in Montreal
by descendant Barbara McCourt.  

She was Lydia Grant, an Irish woman who married a career officer, George Thew Burke, a captain in the 100th Regiment of Foot, who fought with Sir Isaac Brock at Queenston Heights and with Wellington at Waterloo. This devoted couple raised their nine children in Richmond where he was superintendent of the military settlement, a colonel in the militia and a MP in the Parliament of Upper Canada. She died at 37 years of age.

Discover more about Lydia Burke at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo booth.

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AGATHE NOWLAN: Love letters from the war front

June 8th, 2012

War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration
 


Credit Maurice Nowlan’s letters from the war front were cherished by Agathe, “my Dearest jewel.” Letters from Bibliotheque et Archives Nationales du Quebec.

Montreal’s high society was the setting for romance as the dashing Irish officer from the 100th Regiment of Foot wooed the wealthy French-Canadian woman. Lieut. Maurice Nowlan went off to guard the Canadian borders so the young couple wrote copious letters — he in various forts, and she at her parents’ home. Prior to a night attack, Lieut. Nowlan’s final letter is a poignant tribute to their love.

Discover more about Agathe Nowlan at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo booth.

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JANE VAUGHAN: A lady in love with an Irish soldier

June 4th, 2012

War of 1812: Bicentennial Celebration


Her family was fleeing the troubles in Ireland when a shipboard romance changed a young girl’s life. The image is the front cover of Jane Barrett’s 1976 novel, Woman of Ireland.

Lady Jane Copeland fell madly in love with the handsome passenger on the tall ship heading for the Canadian colonies. But her Irish mother was not happy at the intention of her teenaged daughter to marry this red-coated soldier from the 100th Regiment of Foot, especially during a war with the United States. But the headstrong girl married William Vaughan without her mother’s blessing.


Discover more about Jane Vaughan at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo-booth.

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CATHERINE LYON: Living dangerously in a war zone

May 29th, 2012

War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration

Credit: A letter by Cathe Lyon on Oct. 16, 1814, from the Archives of Ontario

Catherine Lyon coped with danger every day as the young bride stayed with her husband, Lieut. George Lyon, in British forts under attack on the Niagara frontier. At the Battle of Chippawa, Lieut. Lyon was seriously injured in cannon fire from an American invading army. Catherine later wrote her aunt fearing that if another “dreadful battle” would break out, the British troops would suffer defeat. Luckily, the Americans returned to the United States. 

Discover more about Catherine Lyon at the new exhibit, launching at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts, new exhibitions and even an old-fashioned photo booth.

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MARIA HILL: Disguised as a man, she went off to war

May 22nd, 2012

War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration

An elderly Maria Hill rides in a float for the 1867 confederation parade in Richmond. The image is from a mural painted by Becky Marr-Johnson.

Maria Hill was no stranger to the blood and gore of battlefields as a nurse tending wounded soldiers. She even disguised herself as a man so she could follow her husband to the front lines. The 21-year-old English girl was truly “a daughter of the regiment” as she marched off to war. 

Discover more about Maria Hill at the Exceptional Women exhibit at the Goulbourn Museum on Sunday, June 17, from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Our War of 1812 Bicentennial Celebration has something for all ages, including historical re-enactors and presentations, War of 1812-themed crafts,
new exhibitions and even and old-fashioned photo-booth.

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John Wright’s Sketch Journal

January 31st, 2012

Goulbourn Museum has recently hired Lord Cultural Resources to create a ten-year strategic plan for the Museum. To start the process, staff met with John Wright, Susan Dunlop and Brad King to discuss the project and to show them the site. While the Lord Cultural Resources representatives were here, we noticed that John Wright was sketching away. We were very pleased to see that John had added his water coloured sketches (above) to his personal blog. You can view his blog here. Thank you John for sharing your sketches with us!

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Remembering the Great War

November 11th, 2011

For Remembrance Day, the Goulbourn Museum installed an exhibit at the Stittsville Branch of the Ottawa Public Library called Remembering the Great War. This exhibit includes artefacts from both World Wars, including a helmet, uniform, grooming kit, bayonet, and gas mask, and will be on display until the end of the month.

Brenda Holtz, one of our fabulous volunteers, spent countless hours compiling scrapbooks for us last year. One scrapbook lists veterans of World War One and World War Two from Goulbourn Township, and the other scrapbook holds copies & transcripts of letters from Private Sefton Stewart. Sefton was a soldier who fought and died in the Great War, and who frequently send letters home to his family. Both scrapbooks are included in this exhibit, and we encourage you to read through them.

For more on the exhibit, please see John Curry’s article in this week’s edition of the Stittsville News (November 10, 2011) on page 13. You can view the Stittsville News online here.

Lest we forget. 

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Going Fishing for Our History

August 22nd, 2011



Historical research is like fishing in the Jock River. You cast and cast a line into murky waters. For Goulbourn Museum’s new travelling exhibit, I did research on the 1805 maiden voyage of the 100th Regiment of Foot. I went to the good fishing places as the late A. Barry Roberts, author of the outstanding history book, For King and Canada, at the Library Archives of Canada to make digital copies of British Colonial Office letters about the military disaster when three of the regiment’s five troopships were wrecked at sea.

Back home, a computer keyboard was my fishing pole — type in 100th regiment 1805 shipwreck, and see the fishtails swirling around. One website lead to another as I got luckier in snagging narratives about the tall ship Nais, also known as Aeneas, off Newfoundland and the brig Two Friends, off Cape Breton Island. More sources are available for the Nais or Aeneas, since the 340 deaths of 347 aboard rates international prominence on the United Kingdom’s major disasters list since 1707 (see Aeneas in third group of 300-499 fatalities here ).

Consequently, historians and journalists have been reporting on this maritime tragedy for 200 years, including Terence Grocott in his 2002 collection, Shipwrecks of the Revolutionary & Napoleonic Eras (see above cover and page). Goulbourn Museum bought the book after seeing it as a primary source for the Wikipedia item.

Kurt Johnson, Munster

Mail to: Kurt@goulbournmuseum.ca

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Exciting finds

August 9th, 2011




Our Goulbourn Museum director gave the key to a treasure chest when Donna Keays-Hockey e-mailed the reference http://www2.swgc.mun.ca/nfld_history/CO194/CO194-45.htm for my research on the 1805 maiden voyage of the 100th County of Dublin Regiment of Foot. Microfilm B-681, stored at the Library and Archives Canada, is a collection of six letters from British military officers reporting on the maritime disasters that befell our Goulbourn regiment. In this August 30, 1806, letter (above), Lieut.-Col. J.W. Gordon seeks financial compensation for “these [two] poor fishermen for the humanity and generosity” in rescuing and sheltering five soldiers and two seamen from the Nais troopship which sank off Newfoundland. The death toll was 340 of the 347 on board.
A. Barry Roberts wrote an excellent account of the “terrible catastrophe” in his well-researched book, For King and Canada. And what a tragic story it is: death and destruction on stormy seas; the absolute horror of men, women and children swept into the icy waters of the Gulf of St. Lawrence, and heroes saving many victims of the shipwrecks.
In doing research for our new museum exhibit on this voyage http://www.emcstittsvillerichmond.ca/20110630/lifestyle/New+museum+exhibit+captures+settlers%27+maiden+voyage+to+Canada, it was exciting to find new information in modern books like Shipwrecks of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Eras, in old publications like Cape Breton’s Magazine, or an 1812 edition of Shipwrecks and Disasters at Sea. These narratives help us present our history with the personal words of flesh-and-blood people, the pathos of tragedy, and the cold facts of knowledge.
Kurt Johnson, Munster

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Voyage of the 100th Regiment

July 5th, 2011

 
Have you ever wondered how pioneers arrived in Goulbourn Township? Or where they came from & why they settled here in 1818?
With the help of our fantastic volunteer Kurt Johnson and some great resources we created a travelling exhibit where visitors will discover how soldiers of the 100th Regiment endured death & hardship on their journey to defend Canada before the War of 1812. This exhibit opens today and is on display at the Stittsville Library until August 4. To see how we created the panels, see this post, and to learn about about the exhibit process and a bit of history, see this article in the Stittsville/Richmond EMC.

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